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Computer and video games
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It has been suggested that Multiplayer game be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)History of…
Computer and video games

Console games
First generation
Second generation
Video game crash of 1983
Third generation
Fourth generation
Fifth generation
Sixth generation
Seventh generation


Arcade games
Golden Age of Arcade Games


Namco's Pac-Man was a hit, and became a cultural phenomenon. The game spawned merchandise, a cartoon series and pop songs, and was one of the most heavily cloned video games of all-time.For the magazine, see Computer and Video Games (magazine).
A computer game is a computer-controlled game where players interact with objects displayed on a screen for the sake of entertainment. A video game is essentially the same form of entertainment, but refers not only to games played on a personal computer, but also to games run by a console or arcade machine. The term "computer game" also includes games which display only text (and which can therefore theoretically be played on a teletypewriter) or which use other methods, such as sound or vibration, as their primary feedback device, or a controller (console games), and a combination of any of the above. Also, more esoteric devices have been used for input (see also Game controller). Usually there are rules and goals, but in more open-ended games the player may be free to do whatever they like within the confines of the virtual universe.

The phrase interactive entertainment is the formal reference to computer and video games. To avoid ambiguity, game software is referred to as "computer and video games" throughout this article, which explores properties common to both types of game.

In common usage, a "computer game" or a "PC game" refers to a game that is played on a personal computer. "Console game" refers to one that is played on a device specifically designed for the use of such, while interfacing with a standard television set. "Video game" (or "videogame"), in places where the term is used, has evolved into a catchall phrase that encompasses the aforementioned along with any game made for any other device, including, but not limited to, mobile phones, PDAs, advanced calculators, etc.


Gameplay
Main article: Gameplay
In computer and video gaming, gameplay is a general term that describes player interaction with a game. It includes direct interaction, such as controls and interface, but also design aspects of the game, such as levels and graphics, it also has various game difficulties in which the game gets harder or easier.

Although the use of this term is often disputed, as it is considered too vague for the range of concepts it describes, it is currently the most commonly used and accepted term for this purpose when describing video games.

 

 

 

 

 

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Snakes
Temporal range:
Late Cretaceous – Present,[1]
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Clade: Ophidia
Suborder: Serpentes
Linnaeus, 1758
Infraorders
Alethinophidia Nopcsa, 1923
Scolecophidia Cope, 1864
World distribution of snakes.svg
Approximate world distribution of snakes, all species
Snakes are elongated, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes.[2] Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs (such as kidneys) appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca. Lizards have evolved elongate bodies without limbs or with greatly reduced limbs about twenty five times independently via convergent evolution, leading to many lineages of legless lizards.[3] Legless lizards resemble snakes, but several common groups of legless lizards have eyelids and external ears, which snakes lack, although this rule is not universal (see Amphisbaenia, Dibamidae, and Pygopodidae).

Living snakes are found on every continent except Antarctica, and on most smaller land masses; exceptions include some large islands, such as Ireland, Iceland, Greenland, the Hawaiian archipelago, and the islands of New Zealand, and many small islands of the Atlantic and central Pacific oceans.[4] Additionally, sea snakes are widespread throughout the Indian and Pacific Oceans. More than 20 families are currently recognized, comprising about 520 genera and about 3,600 species.[5][6] They range in size from the tiny, 10.4 cm (4.1 in)-long thread snake[7] to the reticulated python of 6.95 meters (22.8 ft) in length.[8] The fossil species Titanoboa cerrejonensis was 12.8 meters (42 ft) long.[9] Snakes are thought to have evolved from either burrowing or aquatic lizards, perhaps during the Jurassic period, with the earliest known fossils dating to between 143 and 167 Ma ago.[10] The diversity of modern snakes appeared during the Paleocene period (c 66 to 56 Ma ago). The oldest preserved descriptions of snakes can be found in the Brooklyn Papyrus.

Most species are nonvenomous and those that have venom use it primarily to kill and subdue prey rather than for self-defense. Some possess venom potent enough to cause painful injury or death to humans. Nonvenomous snakes either swallow prey alive or kill by constriction.